Corrosion

Jennifer Segui | September 3, 2014

Billions of dollars are spent each year in the U.S. to repair corrosion damage. To help reduce the high cost of corrosion, engineers at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C. are using multiphysics simulation to gain a better understanding of the fundamental mechanism. A successful research outcome at NRL will establish the correlation between metal microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical strength. Material designers could then develop stronger, corrosion-resistant materials using this new information.

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Fanny Littmarck | May 22, 2014

If you work in the oil and gas industry dealing with offshore drilling, corrosion is your worst enemy. A corroded oil platform is a dangerous platform and it can cost you a lot — in both lives and money. To avoid such a dark fate, you need to safeguard the steel structure from corrosion via a protection system, such as the cathodic protection process shown here.

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Melanie Noessler | February 10, 2014

When designing electrochemical cells, we consider the three classes of current distribution in the electrolyte and electrodes: primary, secondary, and tertiary. We recently introduced the essential theory of current distribution. Here, we illustrate the different current distributions with a wire electrode example to help you choose between the current distribution interfaces in COMSOL Multiphysics for your electrochemical cell simulation.

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Edmund Dickinson | February 7, 2014

In electrochemical cell design, you need to consider three current distribution classes in the electrolyte and electrodes. These are called primary, secondary, and tertiary, and refer to different approximations that apply depending on the relative significance of solution resistance, finite electrode kinetics, and mass transport. Here, we provide a general introduction to the concept of current distribution and discuss the topic from a theoretical stand-point.

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Laura Bowen | June 18, 2013

If you roast a turkey for dinner and you need to check the temperature, the technology exists to find it. But what happens if the temperature is so hot that a consumer-grade thermometer, or any man-made device, really, would instantly melt and be destroyed? This might not be a common occurrence in your kitchen, but it is a real concern in blast furnaces, where temperatures can reach close to 1,500°C. Simply guessing is far from safe. Luckily, by simulating with […]

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Phil Kinnane | June 12, 2012

It’s long been known that a danger with corrosion is that it compromises the structures that it affects. This is particularly relevant for the naval industry where material failure leads to leaks and the like. Now, another danger is becoming apparent.

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Phil Kinnane | May 2, 2012

This Friday, a training course in modeling corrosion is being run at the COMSOL Burlington office. Participants will be introduced to the new Corrosion Module and will be led through a number of different exercises.

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Phil Kinnane | April 30, 2012

We’re increasing the electrochemical family of products with the next version of COMSOL. Joining the Batteries & Fuel Cells and Electrodeposition Modules will be the Corrosion Module. This will allow for the modeling of all types of electrochemical corrosion (galvanic, pitting, etc.) as well as corrosion protection. This has been an exciting development and is the response to a number of COMSOL users who have requested it.

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Phil Kinnane | April 25, 2012

While working on a project that involves corrosion I found this site that spends quite a bit of time explaining the phenomenon. This lab at the NASA Kennedy Space Center has done a great job in summarizing the different types of corrosion that can occur, and how they do occur. Galvanic and pitting corrosion are a couple of types I’ve heard of, but filiform corrosion is a new one.

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