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Blog Posts Tagged Particle Tracing Module

Dielectrophoretic Separation

January 23, 2015

How can you use an electric field to control the movement of electrically neutral particles? This may sound impossible, but in this blog entry, we will see that the phenomenon of dielectrophoresis (DEP) can do the trick. We will learn how DEP can be applied to particle separation and demonstrate a very easy-to-use biomedical simulation app that is created with the Application Builder and run with COMSOL Server™.

Modeling Beam Neutralization with a Charge Exchange Cell

December 16, 2014

Charge exchange cells are often used as a way to obtain neutralized beams of energetic particles. In this blog post, we introduce a model of a simple charge exchange cell and analyze its neutralization efficiency.

New Accumulators Boost Particle and Ray Tracing Functionality

November 26, 2014

With the release of COMSOL Multiphysics version 5.0, the Particle Tracing Module now includes a series of features called Accumulators, which can be used to couple the results of a particle tracing simulation to other physics interfaces. The accumulated variables may represent any physical quantity and can be defined either within domains or on boundaries, making them extremely flexible. Here, I will explain the different types of accumulators and their applications in particle tracing and ray optics models.

Accurate Hematology Analysis Using Hydrofocusing

August 25, 2014

Hematology analysis is an important step in medical diagnoses, often determining the treatment that a patient will receive. With a patient’s life on the line, it is vital that these analyses are accurate to the highest degree possible. Researchers at HORIBA Medical, a worldwide supplier of medical diagnostic equipment, turned to simulation to develop new methods for optimizing the accuracy of their hematology analysis devices. The resulting technique is currently used in some of their best-selling equipment.

Acoustic Levitation Puts a Pure Spin on Medicine Fabrication

July 16, 2014

The need for a contaminant-free space to manufacture medicine has led scientists to try many creative new approaches to improve the process. At Argonne National Lab, creating a device that floats and rotates chemical compounds in thin air was just the answer they were looking for. It meant two important changes: the amount of each chemical necessary could be implemented very precisely and the risk of outside impurities disrupting the results was minimized.

Simulating Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability and Climate Dynamics

March 18, 2014

What do heated soap bubbles, wavy clouds, and Jupiter’s Great Red Spot have in common? Their formation depends on the dynamics of the shear layer existing between two parallel streams moving at different velocities. This unstable motion, called Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is ubiquitous and plays an important role in the dynamics of climate, for example. Let’s take a closer look at the onset and evolution of this instability with the help of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis.

Red Blood Cell Separation from a Flow Channel

January 3, 2014

Before conducting certain blood sample analyses, researchers need to separate the red blood cell particles from the blood plasma. Using lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, red blood cell separation can be achieved via magnetophoresis (i.e., motion induced by magnetic fields). Since the magnetic permeability of the particles is different from the blood plasma, their trajectory can be controlled within the flow channel of the LOC device and then separated out from the fluid.

COMSOL 4.4 Brings Particle-Field and Fluid-Particle Interactions

December 5, 2013

The trajectories of particles through fields can often be modeled using a one-way coupling between physics interfaces. In other words, we can first compute the fields, such as an electric field, magnetic field, or fluid velocity field, and then use these fields to exert forces on the particles using the Particle Tracing Module. If the number density of the particles is very large, however, the particles begin to noticeably perturb the fields around them, and a two-way coupling is needed […]


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