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General Blog Posts

Minimize Your Model File Size with Storing Solution Techniques

September 2, 2016

A COMSOL Multiphysics® simulation typically includes one or more field quantities in its output. Depending on the number of field quantities, the geometry’s complexity, and the mesh density required for valid results, simulations can include millions of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Oftentimes, storing one or more scalar quantities or the results on a small geometry part is sufficient. Here, we explore tools for storing selected output quantities and minimizing model file sizes and the time required to display this data.

How to Reuse a Deformed Shape as a Geometry Input

September 1, 2016

Suppose you take a piece of metal — a thin sheet, for example — and apply some mechanical loads. The metal will deform and take on a new shape that differs from the original undeformed configuration. Say you now want to use this deformed object as part of a new geometry construction. You can then solve another physics problem on the new composite domain. Today, we’ll demonstrate how to use a deformed object as an input to a geometry sequence.

How to Integrate External Data Files with Your COMSOL® App

August 30, 2016

Have you ever wanted to integrate your COMSOL® software apps with external data files? These files can contain material properties, geometric dimensions, or other model inputs, and such data can derive from internal company standards or be provided by a vendor. Built-in methods in the Application Builder simplify reading from these files and displaying options read. To show this procedure, we will build an app that populates a combo box with material properties from a comma-separated values (CSV) file.

Building an App to Optimize the Design of an SOFC Stack

August 23, 2016

Today, guest blogger Matteo Lualdi of resolvent ApS, a COMSOL Certified Consultant, discusses the benefits of creating a simulation app to analyze a solid oxide fuel cell stack. For many businesses, numerical modeling and simulation are valuable tools at various stages of the design workflow, from product development to optimization. Apps further extend the reach of these tools, hiding complex multiphysics models beneath easy-to-use interfaces. Here’s a look at one such example: a solid oxide fuel cell stack app.

Efficiently Mesh Your Model Geometry with Meshing Sequences

August 18, 2016

Does your simulation take a large amount of computational time to solve? One potential reason for this is that your mesh is using too many elements. In cases such as this, you may want to switch to user-controlled mesh to manually build and edit the meshing sequences available in the COMSOL Multiphysics® software as an alternative to using the default meshing sequence. As we’ll highlight with a tutorial example, this can help reduce memory requirements while providing accurate results.

Design an App to Efficiently Model the Flash Method Procedure

August 15, 2016

The flash method, first described by W.J. Parker et. al in 1961, is a widely used technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of materials. Our Flash Method demo app, highlighted here, performs a numerical simulation of this experiment, offering a simplified approach to modifying parameters that can impact its overall accuracy. Today, we’ll take a closer look at this easy-to-use app, as well as the theory behind it.

Part 2: Modeling the Harmonic Excitations of Nonlinear Systems

August 11, 2016

Extending our discussion on modeling the harmonic excitations of linear systems, we will now shift focus to nonlinear systems. We will look at problems where the loading on the system has some sinusoidal components as well as cases where the material properties or loads and constraints depend directly on the solution. As you will see, COMSOL Multiphysics can address these apparently nonlinear cases with some very efficient solution algorithms. Let’s find out how.

Part 1: Modeling the Harmonic Excitations of Linear Systems

August 10, 2016

In many engineering situations, we can assume that excitations on the system of interest and the responses are sinusoidal over time. When this assumption holds, we can use a so-called frequency-domain analysis, which leads to some very efficient solution techniques. Let’s go over a few basic concepts and the conditions under which we can make this assumption, while exploring various solution approaches to take.


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